Suffolk is a vast and diverse county, offering a number of different experiences within its borders that anyone can enjoy. It’s a place that can be enjoyed at any time of year, with the changing landscape meaning that there are a host of activities to try that can be enjoyed by the whole family; some of these activities just aren’t the same anywhere else.

To get more people to experience the real Suffolk, Suffolk County Council have released their Fab 40 Adventures, a list of fun suggestions for things to do in the county across the four seasons. Why not see how many you can tick off? The more activities you complete, the more certificates you will be able to earn. Below is the complete list, perfect to keep you entertained on your caravan holidays in Suffolk:

AUTUMN

1. Make a den

2. Bake a wild blackberry pie

3. Carve a pumpkin lantern and make soup too

4. Build a home for wildlife in your garden

5. Kick fallen leaves in the wood

6. Collect and roast sweet chestnuts

7. See and hear the clash of antlers

8. Capture the colours of autumn

9. Find all sorts of pine cones and make seasonal decorations

10. Eat an apple straight from the tree

See and hear the clash of antlers has been selected as the star activity for autumn, with the best place to try it being at RSPB Minsmere on the Suffolk Coast. Here you’ll be able to witness a truly incredible natural spectacle, where the stags rut by locking antlers, the victor earning the right to mate with the doe. You can enjoy this fantastic nature experience either from the viewing point on Westleton Heath or on a jeep safari, accompanied by an RSPB guide.

WINTER

1. Break the ice on a puddle 

2. Hunt for treasure on the shore

3. Take a night time walk

4. Find the biggest tree in the park or wood

5. Be the first footsteps in the snow

6. Photograph a frosty morning to share with the world

7. Build a nest box and put it up in your garden

8. Spot snowdrops in the woods

9. Take part in the world’s biggest bird survey

10. Watch a robin in your garden and dig him up some dinner

Winter’s star activity is to share with the world a photo of a frosty morning. The county completely changes as winter takes over, transforming the landscape with a dusting of frost, ice and snow, with different bird species also paying Suffolk a visit. All of these things help to make Suffolk a photographer’s paradise.

SPRING

1. Wonder at magical carpets in an ancient bluebell wood

2. Spot a Mad March Hare or two

3. Encounter spring lambs down on the farm

4. Plant it. Grow it. Eat it.

5. Watch a very special show: Strictly Skydancing, featuring Suffolk’s birds of prey

6. Discover signs of pirates in a country churchyard

7. Listen out for a tawny owl

8. Look out for frogspawn in the pond

9. Prepare a wild salad

10. Spring clean a local area

Spring’s star activity is to spot a March hare. March is the beginning of the hare’s mating season, when they begin to display some very interesting behaviour. During this time of the year, they can be seen sprinting across the fields and even ‘boxing’ with each other. There’s a number of places you can visit to see the mad March hares in action, including Trimley Marshes nature reserve and the RSPB Havergate Island reserve.

SUMMER

1. Hide up in a tree and spy on the world

2. See a meteor shower

3. Spot the blue flash of a kingfisher from a riverside path

4. Find your perfect picnic spot

5. Go fishing for crabs

6. Put a toe in the water down at the stream

7. Take a swim in the sea

8. Simply lay back, look and listen

9. Watch dragonflies hunting over the water

10. Discover the beauty of butterflies on a meadowland stroll

Spotting kingfishers is the star activity selected for the summer, though it’s not an easy task. Kingfishers are often seen as a flash of striking cobalt blue before they disappear into the river to catch a fish. They do, however, tend to have their favourite perches, so if you do briefly glimpse one, it is definitely worth sticking around to get a better sighting. One of the best places to see kingfishers is at Lackford Lakes.

Image: Nick Rowland, available under Creative Common